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You don’t know Erika?  Have not read her stories, followed her on adventures over three continents, met the people and places that occupy her?

The Soleil community celebrates its writers. Writing, reading stories and excerpts from books in progress are valued activities supported by members as is the publishing of these works.

 

On August 25, two writers, Josh Langston and Erika Passantino, will present their recent publications during an afternoon of reading and fellowship sponsored by Pat Pugrant and Soleil friends. Jayne Hopping will bring flowers from her garden. Members of the many book clubs are invited.

 

Books will be available for purchase and author signature.

READ MORE ABOUT THE EVENT >

Earlier, the wider Canton and Cherokee County community in the foothills of the Georgia mountains learned about Erika’s book in an article by Abigail Snelson of the Cherokee Tribune and Ledger News.

 

The review placed emphasis on a family’s strength and love that helped them overcome the tragedies of war, devastating illness, of separation and the search for a home on three continents.

 

The book’s title, Coffee Hour in Flensburg, presents the town where, after war’s end, healing and growth were allowed to happen.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE >

On August 4, in the historic Rock Barn of Canton, the book’s launch was celebrated in a gathering of family and friends who had traveled from places as far away as the Netherlands, Oakland, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Acworth.

 

They were joined by representatives of the Decatur Writers Group, members of the Atlanta Writers Club, local scholars and distinguished members of the wider community.

 

This support and friendship are invaluable to the writer whose life is generally centered on a keyboard and sentences swarming around in the mind.

Few of us remain who can draw on living memory to tell about World War II, and the harvest of hate. War only leaves terror and suffering; there are no victors. Yet, sometimes, and miraculously, humor, strength and love find a place where survival lives.

 

As a historian, I study records that might teach me what happened, or might have happened. As a writer, I try to find solace in hidden places; I search memory, asking how it felt. Out of this ambivalence grows the magic of storytelling.

 

Keep going, guide heart and soul to the coming sunshine.